Did You Know- Heartburn can Jeopardize your Oral Health?

Did You Know- Heartburn can Jeopardize your Oral Health?

Acid Erosion, Bad Breath, Sensitivity, Worn Enamel
PGA Dentistry
March 13, 2013
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People, who suffer from heartburn, or acid reflux, usually suffer a double whammy: a threat to good oral health often accompanies uncomfortable symptoms such as throat irritation, gagging, and a bitter taste.

Stomach acids are meant to flow through the digestive system, but for people with reflux, the acid will actually flow up into the esophagus and sometimes even into the throat and mouth which may have an impact on your smile.  Teeth have a neutral pH of 5.5, but stomach acid, as you would expect, is much more acidic at a pH level of 2.0.  Because of this, reflux will erode tooth enamel, inviting sensitivity, pain, and discoloration.  Bad breath may also become chronic.

If you suffer from acid reflux, please seek treatment from your doctor and call PGA Center for Advanced Dentistry in Palm Beach Gardens, FL at: (561) 627-8666 to see Dr. Jay Ajmo so he can make sure your teeth are protected.

PGA Dentistry
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Teeth that look both healthy and attractive are one of the most important and desirable physical attributes of the century so far, and the pressure to obtain a picture-perfect smile is very real. Fortunately, no matter what condition your teeth are in, there are cosmetic dentistry solutions that can help you fin­d your smile again, with porcelain veneers one of the most effective for achieving perfectly shaped, white tee­th.

PGA Dentistry
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PGA Dentistry
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